Arrange support

There are three ways to give your patients further support and next steps.

back
1
What you can arrange

Referral to a multidisciplinary pain programme

Arranging of a follow up appointment with you or a colleague

Referral to a walking for health or exercise referral programme

Multidisciplinary pain programme: This may be particularly important for people who are fearful of activity, have co-existing mental health problems and have been previously been unsuccessful in becoming more active

Follow up with you or a colleague: The arrangement of a follow up appointment would also be appropriate for those people deciding not to become more active yet, but who want to ‘think about it some more’ The follow up appointment could be face to face but could also be via telephone or text.

Exercise on referral schemes are widely available throughout the UK, but their referral criteria and programmes vary. Check the local council’s website or contact the council’s physical activity lead to find out more information.

2
Signpost activities

In England, Active Partnerships coordinate and support the delivery of regional physical activity and sport opportunities with links from their website. Contact them for an overview of regional activity

There is no national database of local activities, but Active Partnerships coordinate a mix of local activities and signpost regional teams from their website.

There are a wide range of UK organisations that support people being active. Further information is shown by clicking on the icons below.

Explore the following list to find out more about specific activities:

Walking

Walking is often considered the most accessible and practical activity for people wishing to be more active. However, for many amputees walking is not possible, and they require a wheelchair for mobility. Regardless of whether its walking or using a wheelchair, spending more time doing this can be an easy way to start increasing activity levels. By building up activity levels gradually this can be incorporated into many aspects of daily routine.

Disabled ramblers are a charity that organise rambles across the country for people with limited mobility that use mobility scooters. Their rambles are graded according to difficulty, with lower difficulty rambles suitable for manual wheelchairs.

British Nordic Walking organise a wide range of Nordic Walking opportunities, from fun events to serious challenges. They have seven instructors who are amputees or healthcare professionals and have adapted their manual to support amputees wishing to get involved, ensuring a better user experience. Nordic Walking UK co-ordinate a national network of Nordic walking groups, instructors and events.

Walking for health is England’s largest network of short health walks over easy terrain supported by a large network of volunteers.

Parkrun can be completed by running, jogging or walking. They organise free, weekly, community-based 5km events all over the UK. They are open to everyone, free, safe and easy to take part in. Most courses are suitable for wheelchair users, but it is advised to contact the event organiser beforehand to discuss the accessibility and terrain of the course. You will never finish last, as the tail walker will always finish behind you!

Ramblers are a long-established walking organisation who support walking for health and have a large catalogue of walking opportunities around the UK as well as opportunities to volunteer to support other walkers. Their website has advice for those with limited mobility and wheelchair users.

Walkit is a website supporting active travel with a route finder delivering local walking routes across a number of major cities in the UK.

Cycling

Cycling can be an enjoyable activity for people of all ages and abilities. The NHS website has advice for those wishing to try it. Stumps and Cranks is a book written to encourage all amputees to discover cycling as an enjoyable form of exercise.

Wheels for All is an initiative that aims to help those with disabilities and differing needs to engage in cycling. They have numerous centres all over the country with specially adapted bicycles and trained staff.

Hand Cycling may be a good alternative for those not wishing to use a traditional bike, and the Hand Cycling Association UK provide further information, advice and events.

Sustrans coordinate the national cycle network and support both cycling and walking nationwide. Their website provides information about cycling routes.

Let’s Ride organise cycling events for all abilities nationwide in partnership with British Cycling.

British Cycling provide information and advice for those wishing to get involved with disability cycling. A number of disability hubs are situated across the UK to improve access to the sport and to improve cycling performance of those wishing to improve.

LimbPower offer advice and links for lower limb amputees wishing to participate in numerous sports and activities, including cycling.

Jogging

It is important to make sure that your current prosthesis is suitable for running. If there are any questions or concerns, contact your local prosthetic centre for advice.

LimbPower offer advice and links for lower limb amputees wishing to participate in numerous sports and activities, including running.

Couch to 5K is a free app that has been designed to get individuals off the couch and running in just 9 weeks, with step-by-step instructions.

Parkrun can be completed by running, jogging or walking. They organise free, weekly, community-based 5km events all over the UK. They are open to everyone, free, safe and easy to take part in. Most courses are suitable for wheelchair users, but it is advised to contact the event organiser beforehand to discuss the accessibility and terrain of the course. You will never finish last, as the tail walker will always finish behind you!

Apps

Ottobock offer a Fitness For Amputees app featuring a range of specifically designed exercises for unilateral lower limb amputees.

Active 10  is an app developed by Public Health England, helping individuals to fit 10-minute bouts of activity, specifically brisk walking, into everyday life

Sport

Advice regarding how to get involved should be available on a sport’s National Governing Body website, with many offering adaptations that make the sport suitable for amputees. Some examples of these adaptations include amputee football, sitting volleyball and wheelchair rugby.

LimbPower offer advice and links for lower limb amputees wishing to participate in numerous sports and activities.

Wheelpower are a national charity that provide opportunities for those wishing to participate in wheelchair sport. Their website provides information on how to get involved with a huge range of different sports.

 

Parasport enable those with a disability to search for inclusive activities in their local area.

 

Active Partnerships are a network of local agencies that co-ordinate and support the delivery of regional physical activity and sport opportunities. Their website enables individuals to search for activities in their local area.

Conservation and Volunteering activities

The Community Volunteering (TCV) charity support people to improve their health and wellbeing by being outdoors, active and connected with others. They have a nationwide network of activities, including a programme called GreenGym in which volunteers undertake conservation activities, such as establishing wildlife ponds or planting trees, with an emphasis on health and fitness.

Parkrun offer opportunities to volunteer at their events. Information regarding how to do this can be found on their website (hyperlink https://www.parkrun.org.uk/howtovolunteer/)

The National Trust have a range of volunteering opportunities at various sites across the country.

Forestry England offer a number of wide range of opportunities to volunteer across England, including maintenance of walking trails, vegetation management and practical conservation. Forestry and Land Scotland offer similar opportunities in Scotland.

At work

Workplace Challenge is a national workplace programme which provides an opportunity to record levels of sport, physical activity and active travel amongst employees, in competition with other workplaces.

The cycle to work scheme encourages employees to cycle to work and allows big savings on bikes and accessories. Employees interested in the scheme should speak to their employer to find out whether they have signed up.

Being active with a disability

As this Moving Medicine resource is specifically aimed at lower limb amputees, the other activity categories have numerous suggestions suitable for those with a disability. Some of the key organisations working to help lower limb amputees be more active are detailed below.

LimbPower offer advice, links and resources for lower limb amputees wishing to participate in numerous sports and physical activity, as well as organising a number of events and workshops.

The Activity Alliance works to enable organisations to support people with disabilities to be and stay active.

 

The Limbless Association provide a range of information and support to the limb-loss community, including a directory of sports and activities.

 

WheelPower are a national charity that provide opportunities for those wishing to participate in wheelchair sport.

 

Parasport enable those with a disability to search for inclusive activities in their local area.

Disadvantaged communities

Many regions offer exercise on referral schemes. Local GP surgeries will have further information regarding what is available.

Sporting equals is a partner organisation of Sport England that promotes physical activity and participation in sport by disadvantaged communities particularly for people in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic populations sportingequals.org.uk

Family

Many of the activities listed in the other categories, such as ‘walking or using a wheelchair’, ‘jogging’ and ‘sport’ have activities that can be performed with family members.

Change4Life is Public Health England’s flagship social marketing programme aimed at tackling obesity and encouraging families with children aged 5-11 to ‘eat well, move more, live longer’.

Click here to find  local parks, open spaces and playgrounds.

The National Trust have numerous historic houses, gardens, forests and more across the country, enabling active family days out.

This Girl Can is a national campaign to help women overcome the fear of judgement that is stopping too many women and girls from being active.

Home based exercises

Moving Medicine have also helped to develop a physical activity class programme in Oxford University Hospitals. A number of videos have been developed and these can be found here.

LimbPower offer advice and links for lower limb amputees wishing to participate in numerous sports and activities. Their website includes a number of exercise videos that can be performed at home.

Generation Games, a regional Age UK programme, hosts videos designed to support home based exercises, including an exercise routine designed for older people. It is suitable for everyone, whatever their ability or fitness level and can be done sitting or standing to help build strength, balance and cardiovascular fitness. A DVD may be available on request.

Dance and Fitness

Many local leisure centres will offer dance and fitness classes. Contacting them directly will help to determine whether they are suitable.

ParaDance UK aim to develop and promote dance as a sport and an inclusive leisure activity across the country for those who would otherwise be excluded. To find a local group use their find a group function.

Step Change Studios is a pioneering company that make dance accessible to everyone, offering opportunities for disabled and non-disabled people to dance.

3
SUPPORT ORGANISATIONS

Support from people who understand your condition

LimbPower work to engage amputees and individuals with limb impairments in physical activity, sport and the arts to improve quality of life and aid lifelong rehabilitation. A dedicated physical activity, sport and arts officer, called a National Sports Development Officer, manages a team of Physical Activity Advisers who work at Limb Centres throughout the country. LimbPower help people reach their potential through advocacy, events, workshops and access to a wealth of resources online, including:

In addition, LimbPower’s Physical Activity Advisors visit local limb centres to support patients in being more active, and also work with staff to improve their awareness of local physical activity opportunities.

Activity Alliance work to make active lives possible by enabling organisations to support disabled individuals to be and stay active. Their work is centred on research and insight with disabled people as well as engagement with organisations from various sectors. Key resources they have produced to support physical activity include:

The Limbless Association are a leading charity for the limb-loss community, providing a wealth of information and support to their members. They have a huge amount of experience and expertise in providing assistance regarding legal advice and welfare benefits. In addition, they co-ordinate a community of volunteer visitors throughout the UK, a group of established amputees that offer support and advice to anyone who has had, or is having, an amputation.

Within this network there are many who lead active lives beyond limb-loss and who can offer practical and moral support around their respective hobbies and interests, such as how to get started, the challenges they faced and other opportunities that may be of interest.

Their physical activity resources include: